Who ARTed: Weekly Art History for All Ages
Fun Fact Friday - Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper

Fun Fact Friday - Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper

April 15, 2022

One Leonardo da Vinci’s most famous works is not housed in a museum. It is in the Convent of Santa Maria in Milan Italy. It seems totally fitting for a depiction of the last supper was painted on the wall in the convent’s dining hall. Visitors today are often surprised by how enormous the work it. The People are life sized on this massive 15 by 29 foot painting. Another surprising fact is that while people flock to see Leonardo’s work on the wall of the convent, very little if any of what we see there today was actually painted by Leonardo.

You can find an image of the work at www.whoartedpodcast.com

Who ARTed is a part of Airwave Media

Fun Fact Friday - The Burghers of Calais

Fun Fact Friday - The Burghers of Calais

April 8, 2022

In America, a lot of high school students are studying for the AP Art History Exam to try to earn college credit. I am trying to make sure my podcast can be a helpful resource for learning about art history and in a lot of my fun fact mini episodes I cover works of art that are required for the test. 

This mini episode covers a bit about Rodin and the story behind his piece, The Burghers of Calais.

 

Who ARTed is a part of Airwave Media

As always you can find images of the work discussed on my website www.whoartedpodcast.com

If you enjoy Who ARTed, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app to help others discover the show.

 

Arts Madness Round 5

Arts Madness Round 5

March 30, 2022

We are down to our final four artists in this year's Arts Madness Tournament. We started with 64 diverse artists and now we are at the semi-finals determining which two will advance to the final round. 

This week I read a few of the statements issued by students around the US explaining why they picked these artists as their favorites to win the tournament. 

Please vote for your favorite artists at www.whoartedpodcast.com

Also, if you enjoy the show, please follow and leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app.

Ivan Albright  - The Picture of Dorian Gray

Ivan Albright - The Picture of Dorian Gray

March 28, 2022

For this week's episode, I was joined by Kelly Henrikson, art teacher at Park Junior High, to talk about Ivan Albright. 

Ivan Albright is considered to be a great macabre painter. He is known for his portraits and still lives that have a sense of rot showing the frailty of life. His style is considered magical realism. He meticulously rendered portraits that were unlike anything else in his day. In this episode we discussed the painting he created for the film adaptation of Oscar Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray. 

As always, you can find pictures of the work on the website www.whoartedpodcast.com

The Picture of Dorian Gray is housed at The Art Institute of Chicago

 

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

Fun Fact Friday - Did Vincent Van Gogh Really Only Sell 1 Painting?

Fun Fact Friday - Did Vincent Van Gogh Really Only Sell 1 Painting?

March 25, 2022

Vincent van Gogh is a legendary figure in art history. He is one of my favorite artists and his paintings sell for tens of millions of dollars today, but it is often said that he sold only one painting during his lifetime. In this episode, I talk about his commercial success or lack thereof. 

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

Fun Fact Friday - Pablo Picasso, Art Thief? (encore)

Fun Fact Friday - Pablo Picasso, Art Thief? (encore)

March 18, 2022

This is an encore presentation of the mini episode I recorded on Pablo Picasso and his tendency to appropriate or even downright steal from those around him. In 1911, The Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre Museum and Pablo Picasso was one of the prime suspects. While he was not guilty of that crime, he was in possession of some other works that were stamped property of The Louvre and he went on trial facing deportation. 

Just a reminder while Picasso was knocked out of our Arts Madness Tournament in round 1 this year, you can still vote for your favorites among the remaining artists at www.whoartedpodcast.com

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

KAWS - The KAWS Album

KAWS - The KAWS Album

March 14, 2022

This week's episode was about KAWS. I spoke with Rebecca Potts Aguirre about KAWS and two of his works. Rebecca Potts Aguirre hosts a wonderful podcast: Teaching Artist. She is a teaching artist herself with years of classroom experience and she is a wonderful practicing artist. Here are the links to her relevant content:

https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/

https://www.rebeccapotts.com/

https://www.instagram.com/pottsart 

https://linktr.ee/pottsart

Clearly, she is doing tons of amazing things and I was happy she found the time to squeeze one more thing into her schedule and join me to talk about KAWS.

 

KAWS is a highly saught after contemporary artist. He got his start in graffiti as well as doing some freelance work on shows like Doug and Daria. Today his work is controversial at times but bright, colorful, pop art inspired with a contemporary twist that is undeniably fun. 

As always you can find images of the works we discussed at www.whoartedpocast.com

While you are at the website, cast your vote in this week's matchups for the Arts Madness tournament.

Vote in Round 3 of Arts Madness

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

Fun Fact Friday - The Nazca Lines

Fun Fact Friday - The Nazca Lines

March 11, 2022

This is a fun fact Friday mini episode covering a little bit of information about the Nazca Lines. 

The Nazca Lines are massive geoglyphs created in Peru around 400-600 CE. While there is a lot that is uncertain about them, the most common theory is that they were created for religious reasons. While the designs are absolutely huge with lines that span several miles, the full design is not really visible from the ground so they were not widely known until the age of aviation. In 1930 the designs were rediscovered by people flying in a plane over Nazca and they have been studied and speculated about ever since. 

You can find an image of some of the glyphs at www.whoartedpocast.com

 

 

Arts Madness Round 2

Arts Madness Round 2

March 9, 2022

This is a bonus episode covering some of the highlights from this year's Arts Madness Tournament. Arts Madness is a great way to encourage kids to explore art history and learn about a variety of different artists. Please tell your art teacher friends to join in the fun with their classes and vote at www.whoartedpodcast.com 

As always, if you enjoy the show, please follow and rate it on your favorite podcast app.

MC Escher - Circle Limit 3

MC Escher - Circle Limit 3

March 7, 2022

For this week's episode I talked with David Pittman, an amazing teacher I am lucky to count among my friends. 

We discussed MC Escher and briefly touched on a few of his works including Circle Limit 3 from 1959. Interestingly, while Escher is often associated with math as his tessellations are enjoyed by a number of mathematicians and held up for their beautiful applications of geometry, Escher himself was not the greatest student and even failed his math courses in school. In a somewhat common theme among the brilliant and successful, he persisted and even seemed to lean in to developing his skills in an area where he struggled. 

A big turning point came when Escher traveled to Spain and Italy in the early 20th century. At first, he was captivated by the beautiful Italian landscape, but after touring a 14th-century Moorish castle he started to shift his entire approach to art. Escher made sketches of the tile work and the beautiful tessellated patterns he saw then started to apply that patterning to his work. The great leap that he took, however, was introducing representational imagery to the patterns and having figures that shifted through the piece. In his metamorphosis piece, we see patterns of birds that become cubes that turn into a landscape then chess pieces. It is a little bit surreal, almost like an exquisite corpse drawing as seemingly unrelated images flow from one into the next but with an added layer of complexity because of the patterning. 

As always you can find images of the works we discussed at www.whoartedpocast.com

While you are at the website, cast your vote in this week's matchups for the Arts Madness tournament.

Vote for Round 2 of Arts Madness here.

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude - The Floating Piers

Christo and Jeanne-Claude - The Floating Piers

February 28, 2022

For those who enjoy exploring the visual arts in an audio medium, this week we focused on Christo and Jeanne-Claude. You can see an image of The Floating Piers at the website www.WhoARTedPodcast.com

My guest for this week was the one and only Tim Bogatz. He is a tremendous veteran art teacher and host of Art Ed Radio from The Art of Education University. It was great to get to talk to him and hear his insights into this unique bit of art history. He was also nice enough to have me record an episode for his show, so be sure to check out Art Ed Radio.

 

June 18 - July 3, 2016 Christo and his assistants used 100,000 square meters of bright yellow fabric to transform Lake Iseo in Italy. The fabric floated on top of floating dock system comprised of 220,000 polystyrene cubes. The fabric floated just above the surface moving with the water. There was no need for tickets or reservations. It was free for everyone to walk on as Christo said it was an extension of the street. The piers provided a walkway on the water connecting a small island to the mainland. Estimates are 72k-100k people visited per day, around 1.2 million people total over the 16 days. Christo and Jeanne-Claude had the idea for the floating piers in 1970. This was his first large-scale project since her death in 2009. If you are concerned about the environmental impacts of polystyrene on the water, after the exhibition, all of the material was gathered and recycled. Still not as eco friendly as Goldsworthy, but not as bad a Exxon.

This week is the start to my annual Arts Madness tournament. I would love to have as many people as possible join in the fun of judging a diverse collection of artists and works. Over 6 weeks, we will go from 64 great artists down to 1 ultimate Arts Madness champion. More information is on the Arts Madness page of my website.

Vote for your favorites in the Round 1 Matchups before March 5.

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

 

Fun Fact Friday - Edmonia Lewis and The Death of Cleopatra

Fun Fact Friday - Edmonia Lewis and The Death of Cleopatra

February 25, 2022

Edmonia Lewis had an interesting life, and her sculpture The Death of Cleopatra had an equally interesting ride. After it was exhibited in Philadelphia for the Centennial Exhibition, it was put into storage in Chicago. It would later sit in a saloon, mark the grave of a horse, serve as an arts and crafts project for some local Boy Scouts before finally being professionally restored and displayed at the Smithsonian Museum of Art. 

As always, you can find images and more at www.whoartedpodcast.com 

Please consider participating in the upcoming Arts Madness Tournament where listeners from around the world will vote for their favorite artists in a bracketed tournament winnowing the field from 64 down to 1 ultimate artist. 

If you would like to support the show, I recently partnered with Ko-Fi to be able to accept donations to cover the costs of production. You can buy me a coffee at https://ko-fi.com/whoarted Because I do not want disruptive ads and I put nothing behind a paywall, listener donations are my only means of defraying the costs. I greatly appreciate your support.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Arts Madness Tournament

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Arts Madness Tournament

February 17, 2022

For the last few years, I have had a lot of fun with my students exploring art history through a tournament of artists. I randomly assigned 64 diverse artists to different spots in a bracketed tournament modeled after the popular NCAA March Madness tradition. Each week, voters will decide which artists deserve to advance to the next round. I have the brackets up on my website www.whoartedpodcast.com 

More information about the Arts Madness tournament is on the Arts Madness page I would encourage all my fellow art teachers to try this as an entry routine for the spring. It only takes a few minutes to get the kids voting but they will become incredibly engaged in debating which artist is better than another. I have also included a page showing all 64 artists, their works and an episode about them to help kids learn about any artist who catches their eye. To help get them hooked, I have a little prize as well. On my Arts Madness page, I have a prediction form open from now through March 6. Fill out who you think will win and why. At the end of the tournament, I will raffle off Amazon gift cards to a few people who correctly predicted the winner. Additionally, at the end of the tournament, I will read a few people's statements about why that artist deserved to win when I announce the winning artist on the podcast.

This is a fun and easy way to get your students critically engaged in analyzing artworks from all around the world. Please give it a try in your classroom to help your students discover the joy of exploring art history.

 

#art #artsed #arteducation #education #k12artchat #artofeducation 

Fun Fact Friday - The Renaissance Painter Who Played with his Food

Fun Fact Friday - The Renaissance Painter Who Played with his Food

February 11, 2022

Giuseppe Acrimboldo is best known for his quirky arrangements of food, foliage, animals and objects that form surreal portraits. 

For more information and images of the work discussed, check out the website www.whoartedpodcast.com

Raphael’s The School of Athens

Raphael’s The School of Athens

January 28, 2022

This is a fun fact Friday mini episode about The School of Athens painted by Raphael in 1510 C.E. In this classic Rennaisance masterpiece, Raphael painted numerous classic Greek philosophers. The theme of the work is seeking knowledge and wisdom by coming to understand what came before and root causes. In this work, Raphael included a small self-portrait peeking out among the philosophers. Some say two of the ancient philosophers bear a striking resemblance to Raphael's fellow Rennaisance artists, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. 

Take a closer look at The School of Athens linked here or as always you can find more resources at www.whoartedpodcast.com

#art #arthistory #artsed #arteducation #renaissance #aparthistory #raphael

Fun Fact Friday - Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait

Fun Fact Friday - Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait

January 7, 2022

This mini episode is about Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait. It is one of the most famous paintings of a couple and loaded with symbolism. Mostly, it symbolizes that the couple was totally rich. 

As always you can find an image of the work at www.whoartedpodcast.com

The website also has resources for my fellow art teachers, and if you enjoy this podcast, please follow and rate it on your favorite podcast app.

Finally, please check out my other podcast, Art Smart available on Spotify.

Fun Fact Friday - From a King‘s Bathroom to an Iconic Museum

Fun Fact Friday - From a King‘s Bathroom to an Iconic Museum

April 9, 2021

The Louvre is one of the most famous museums in the world with an expansive collection of some of the greatest masterpieces ever created. Interestingly, it did not start out that way. The building actually started as a medieval fortress. It had a moat, walls and a fortified tower in the center. Of course as Paris expanded, the fortifications moved to the exterior of the city and the Louvre was converted to a royal residence in the 14th century. The fortress was mostly demolished and extensive renovations were underway but people got distracted with the whole hundred years war going on and the Louvre basically was dormant for some time. In 1527, King Francois changed all that. He was a poet, a patron of the arts and he built up quite the collection. He acquired the Mona Lisa among other works and he is said to have hung the iconic masterpiece in his bathroom. Of course his bathroom was a little nicer than the average outhouse. His sprawling residence housed numerous works of art and eventually he started to display these works making them accessible to the public.

 

This will be the final new episode for this season of Who ARTed. I will rebroadcast either the Georgia O'Keeffe, or Yayoi Kusama episode on Monday depending on who wins the Arts Madness tournament, but then I will be taking a break for a while. I may do a run of a few mini episodes if I have time over the summer, but otherwise look for new episodes in your podcast feed when Season 3 starts in the fall. 

Fun Fact Friday - Michelangelo Stunk

Fun Fact Friday - Michelangelo Stunk

December 11, 2020

Michelangelo is one of the most celebrated artists in history. He is known for having created some of the finest masterpieces in the world including the painting on the Sistine Chapel and the statue of David. As talented people become historical figures over the centuries, a lot of their humanity can be lost in historical accounts that feature only their highlights. I generally believe in giving people the generous edit and focusing on their good aspects, but going too far in mythologizing an artist or anyone else can be unhelpful. To focus only on their brilliance and ignore their struggles and shortcomings can be frustrating and cut short the growth of future generations of artists under the shadow of larger than life "old masters." With that in mind, I share that while Michelangelo's art was absolutely beautiful, the artist himself was kind of gross.

Fun Fact Friday -It Really Seems Like Leonardo da Vinci Had ADHD

Fun Fact Friday -It Really Seems Like Leonardo da Vinci Had ADHD

November 27, 2020

To be accurate, this one is a little more of a "Fun Speculation Friday" as we will never know for a fact whether he had ADHD. He was not diagnosed in his lifetime and no credible diagnostician would pretend that they definitively prove someone had a disorder 500 years after they died. Still to consider him as an artist with a disability makes Leonardo da Vinci even more inspiring. Leonardo da Vinci is one of the most talented artist the world has ever known. He is frequently held up as the ideal "Renaissance man" because of his notebooks full of scientific study, observations and plans for different inventions. The thing is, he never got around to editing, organizing or publishing those notes in order to help others learn and build off of his study. He never got around to building his machines. The majority of his work went unfinished. While many great artists from history created hundreds or thousands of works, Leonardo only appears to have completed a few dozen and he was notorious for taking absurdly long to do so. It took him over a decade to complete the Mona Lisa. He spent 3 years painting The Last Supper and he only finished that work after his patron threatened to cut off his funding. That distractibility and constant thirst for knowledge on a wide range of topics likely made him frustrating to work with, but it is also what made him brilliant.

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci

December 26, 2019

For this episode, we discussed Leonardo da Vinci, the artist known to embody the Renaissance ideal of study and mastery of diverse topics. First we discussed the historical context and a little bit about his biography, then for our In Gallery segment, we discussed one of Leonardo's most famous masterpieces, The Mona Lisa

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